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Currencies

View live forex rates. Live streaming allows you to quickly spot any changes to a range of market assets.

EUR/USD

The EUR/USD (or Euro Dollar) currency pair belongs to the group of ‘Majors’, a way to mention the most important pairs in the world. The popularity of Euro Dollar is due to the fact that it gathers two main economies: Europe and the United States of America. This is a widely traded currency pair where the Euro is the base currency and the US Dollar is the counter currency. Since the EUR/USD pair consists of more than half of all the trading volume worldwide in the Forex Market, it is almost impossible for a gap to appear, let alone a consequent breakaway gap in the opposite direction.

USD/JPY

The US Dollar Japanese Yen can be seriously affected by news or the decisions taken by two main central banks: The Federal Reserve Bank (Fed) and The Bank of Japan (BOJ).

GBP/USD

The Pound-Dollar is one of the oldest and most widely traded currency pairs in the world. Watch the live GBP/USD rate with the chart and keep up to date with Pound-Dollar news and analysis. Plan your trades with the GBP/USD forecast.

AUD/USD

The AUD/USD pair, also called the “Aussie”, tells the trader how many US dollars (the quote currency) are needed to purchase one Australian dollar (the base currency). This currency pair is also known as the “Aussie”. Together with the New Zealand Dollar and the Canadian Dollar, the AUD is a commodity currency, that is a currency whose country’s exports are largely comprised of raw materials (precious metals, oil, agriculture, etc.).

USD/CAD

The USD/CAD tells the trader how many Canadian dollars (the quote currency) are needed to purchase one U.S. dollar (the base currency). This currency pair is known as the “Loonie”, a nickname derived from the picture of a loon, a distinctive bird which appears on one side of Canada’s gold-coloured, one Dollar coin.

USD/CHF

USD/CHF is the abbreviation for the U.S. dollar and Swiss Franc cross. Trading the USD/CHF currency pair is also known as trading the “Swissie”. The Swiss franc is the only franc left in Europe after the rest joined the euro. It is often seen as a safe-haven currency (any globally traded currency that serves as a reliable and stable store of value). In times of uncertainty, the franc usually stays stable or appreciates against its European counterparts. The USD/CHF tends to have a negative correlation with the EUR/USD and GBP/USD currency pairs. This is due to the positive correlation of the euro, Swiss franc and the British pound.

USD/HKD

The US Dollar / Hong Kong Dollar is the most popular pair to trade the Hong Kong currency. The Hong Kong Monetary Authority’s primary objective is to ensure stability of the HKD exchange rate, instead of primarily focusing on inflation rates or growth like most central banks. Hong Kong is increasingly integrated with China, and many consider it a gateway of capital into and out of the world’s second largest economy. Hong Kong exports and imports were both bigger than the size of the net GDP in 2012, and China intakes more than half of Hong Kong’s exports.

EUR/GBP

The EUR/GBP pair tells the trader how many British Pounds (the quote currency) are needed to purchase one Euro (the base currency). This is one of the most traded currency pairs. Since the European and British economies are massively intertwined (large amounts of capital are exchanged on a daily basis between the United Kingdom and all European countries), the pair tends to be relatively stable but events and news related to the exit of Great Britain of the European Union will probably affect the pair and create choppier movements than usual. A public vote (known as a referendum) was held in June 2016, when 17.4 million people opted for Brexit. This gave the Leave side 52%, compared with 48% for Remain. The UK officially left the EU on 31st of January 2020.